In this engaging melodrama, Stanton Carlisle (Tyrone Power) is a lowlife working in a carnival. Knowing a good con when he sees one, he learns the tricks of a mind-reading act from Zeena (Joan Blondell), then tosses her aside. In time, he becomes ?The Great Stanton,? star attraction of swanky nightclubs and the darling of society. But with all his notoriety built on lies, it?s only a matter of time before exposure brings Stanton?s world crashing down around him.The long-awaited emergence of Nightmare Alley into the light of DVD should achieve two things: make a legendary film noir available to a new generation, and restore the horrific charge to the lately watered-down term geek, a concept that once had the power to give people very bad dreams indeed.

To his lasting credit, Tyrone Power–20th Century Fox’s extraordinarily handsome but not terribly interesting star of the ’30s and ’40s–begged for the chance to play Stan Carlisle, the predatory charmer who snakes his way through this bracingly unwholesome story. A spieler for–and lover of–carnival mind reader Zeena (Joan Blondell), he displays uncanny skill at “reading” the susceptible rubes, including a tough sheriff who turns to jelly after Stan psychs him out. Once Stan’s mastered the intricate code used in Zeena’s act, he’s set to dump her for the younger, sexier Molly (Coleen Gray) and go bigtime as nightclub psychic “Stanton the Great.” After that, it’s only a blasphemous bank shot to superstardom as a miracle worker with his own tabernacle and radio show.

Few ’40s films ventured as deeply into cynicism as Nightmare Alley, or dealt so frankly with sexuality (with ripplings of polymorphous perversity yet) and power-tripping. The movie’s rhythm is uncertain and Jules Furthman’s screenplay telegraphs things, but the overall tone is remarkable, as are individual sequences: the freaky forced marriage of Stan and Molly in accordance with carny morality, and a creepy night scene in a park when Stanton the Great raises a ghost for a high-society client. Cinematographer Lee Garmes’s chiaroscuro creates a relief map of the carnival world and what passes for life there. As for the geek… well, you’ll find out what geek means. Stan does. –Richard T. Jameson

Product Features

  • Factory sealed DVD

Click Here For More Information